FEMALE HORMONE REPLACEMENT

Testosterone increases sexual drive
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A women of 40 has half the Testosterone level of a women of 21.  Women with low libido who received 1/3rd the amount of testosterone that elderly men receive, they had after 24 week of using the testosterone patch copulated at twice the rate of those who received a placebo.   Results supported by 3 separate studies with similar protocols.  The first study is on the decline of testosterone, the next 3 on the use of the patch--jk.   

 

The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism

Vol 80, 1429-1430, Copyright 1995 by Endocrine Society

Twenty-four-hour mean plasma testosterone concentration declines with age in normal premenopausal women

B Zumoff, GW Strain, LK Miller and W Rosner
Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, New York 10003, USA.

http://jcem.endojournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/80/4/1429

The 24-h mean plasma concentration of total testosterone (T) was measured in 33 healthy, regularly cycling, nonobese women between 21 and 51 yr of age. Percent free T was measured in 17 of them. Plasma dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) were measured in 24 of them, and the DHEA-to-T and DHEAS-to-T ratios were calculated. It was found that the concentration of total T showed a steep decline with age; the regression equation was: T (nanomoles per L) = 37.8 x age-1.12 (r = -0.54; P < 0.003). According to this equation, the expected T concentration of a woman of 40 would be 0.61 nmol/L, about half that of a woman of 21 (1.3 nmol/L). The percent free T did not vary significantly with age, so free T concentration likewise showed a steep decline with age. The DHEA-to-T and DHEAS-to-T ratios were both age invariant, clearly because the levels of DHEA and DHEAS also decline steeply with age, as previously reported.
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These results were duplicated in a similar study, below.  Again, double the rate of sexual intercourse for the testosterone group after 24 weeks. 

Obstetrics & Gynecology

May 2005, Vol. 105, Issue 5, Part 1, pp. 944-952

Testosterone Patch for Low Sexual Desire in Surgically Menopausal Women: A Randomized Trial

Buster, John E. MD; Kingsberg, Sheryl A. PhD; Aguirre, Oscar MD; Brown, Candace PhD; Breaux, Jeffrey G. MD; Buch, Akshay PhD; Rodenberg, Cynthia A. PhD; Wekselman, Kathryn RN, PhD; Casson, Peter MD

ABSTRACT:

OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy and safety of a 300 μg/d testosterone patch for the treatment of hypoactive sexual desire disorder in surgically menopausal women on concomitant estrogen therapy.

METHODS: Five hundred thirty-three women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder who had undergone previous hysterectomy and bilateral oophorectomy were enrolled in a 24-week, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Patients were randomly assigned to receive placebo or the testosterone patch twice weekly. The primary efficacy endpoint was change from baseline at week 24 in the frequency of total satisfying sexual activity, measured by the Sexual Activity Log. Secondary measures included sexual desire using the Profile of Female Sexual Function and personal distress as measured by the Personal Distress Scale. Hormone levels, adverse events, and clinical laboratory measures were reviewed.

RESULTS: Total satisfying sexual activity significantly improved in the testosterone patch group compared with placebo after 24 weeks (mean change from baseline, 1.56 compared with 0.73 episodes per 4 weeks, P = .001). Treatment with the testosterone patch also significantly improved sexual desire (mean change, 10.57 compared with 4.29, P < .001) and decreased personal distress (P = .009). Serum free, total, and bioavailable testosterone concentrations increased from baseline. Overall, adverse events were similar in both groups (P > .05). The incidence of androgenic adverse events was higher in the testosterone group; most androgenic adverse events were mild.

CONCLUSION: In surgically menopausal women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder, a 300 μg/d testosterone patch significantly increased satisfying sexual activity and sexual desire, while decreasing personal distress, and was well tolerated through up to 24 weeks of use.

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The endocrinology of sexual arousal
J. Endocrinol., September 1, 2005; 186(3): 411 - 427.

 

S. R. Davis, M. Moreau, R. Kroll, C. Bouchard, N. Panay, M. Gass, G. D. Braunstein, A. L. Hirschberg, C. Rodenberg, S. Pack, et al.
Testosterone for Low Libido in Postmenopausal Women Not Taking Estrogen
N. Engl. J. Med., November 6, 2008; 359(19): 2005 - 2017.

 

ABSTRACT

Background The efficacy and safety of testosterone treatment for hypoactive sexual desire disorder in postmenopausal women not receiving estrogen therapy are unknown.

Methods We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, 52-week trial in which 814 women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder were randomly assigned to receive a patch delivering 150 or 300 g of testosterone per day or placebo. Efficacy was measured to week 24; safety was evaluated over a period of 52 weeks, with a subgroup of participants followed for an additional year. The primary end point was the change from baseline to week 24 in the 4-week frequency of satisfying sexual episodes.

Results At 24 weeks, the increase in the 4-week frequency of satisfying sexual episodes was significantly greater in the group receiving 300 g of testosterone per day than in the placebo group (an increase of 2.1 episodes vs. 0.7, P<0.001{control group]) but not in the group receiving 150 g per day (1.2 episodes, P=0.11). As compared with placebo, both doses of testosterone were associated with significant increases in desire (300 g per day, P<0.001; 150 g per day, P=0.04) and decreases in distress (300 g per day, P<0.001; 150 g per day, P=0.04). The rate of androgenic adverse events — primarily unwanted hair growth — was higher in the group receiving 300 g of testosterone per day than in the placebo group (30.0% vs. 23.1%). Breast cancer was diagnosed in four women who received testosterone (as compared with none who received placebo); one of the four received the diagnosis in the first 4 months of the study period, and one, in retrospect, had symptoms before undergoing randomization.

Conclusions In postmenopausal women not receiving estrogen therapy, treatment with a patch delivering 300 g of testosterone per day resulted in a modest but meaningful improvement in sexual function. The long-term effects of testosterone, including effects on the breast, remain uncertain. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00131495

For those who want to ready a highly technical, lengthy article on the action of testosterone in the brain, click on link below

Estrogen, Menopause, and the Aging Brain: How Basic Neuroscience Can Inform Hormone Therapy in Women

The Journal of Neuroscience, October 11, 2006, 26(41):10332-10348; doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3369-06.2006

http://www.jneurosci.org/cgi/content/full/26/41/10332

 

 

 

 

http://journals.lww.com/greenjournal/Abstract/2005/05000/Testosterone_Patch_for_Low_Sexual_Desire_in.6.aspx

Obstetrics and Gynecology   May 2005, Vol. 105, Issue 5, Part 1, pp. 944-952

Testosterone Patch for Low Sexual Desire in Surgically Menopausal Women: A Randomized Trial

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy and safety of a 300 μg/d testosterone patch for the treatment of hypoactive sexual desire disorder in surgically menopausal women on concomitant estrogen therapy.

METHODS: Five hundred thirty-three women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder who had undergone previous hysterectomy and bilateral oophorectomy were enrolled in a 24-week, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Patients were randomly assigned to receive placebo or the testosterone patch twice weekly. The primary efficacy endpoint was change from baseline at week 24 in the frequency of total satisfying sexual activity, measured by the Sexual Activity Log. Secondary measures included sexual desire using the Profile of Female Sexual Function and personal distress as measured by the Personal Distress Scale. Hormone levels, adverse events, and clinical laboratory measures were reviewed.

RESULTS: Total satisfying sexual activity significantly improved in the testosterone patch group compared with placebo after 24 weeks (mean change from baseline, 1.56 compared with 0.73 episodes per 4 weeks, P = .001). Treatment with the testosterone patch also significantly improved sexual desire (mean change, 10.57 compared with 4.29, P < .001) and decreased personal distress (P = .009). Serum free, total, and bioavailable testosterone concentrations increased from baseline. Overall, adverse events were similar in both groups (P > .05). The incidence of androgenic adverse events was higher in the testosterone group; most androgenic adverse events were mild.

CONCLUSION: In surgically menopausal women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder, a 300 μg/d testosterone patch significantly increased satisfying sexual activity and sexual desire, while decreasing personal distress, and was well tolerated through up to 24 weeks of use.

 

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